Thursday, 14 January 2016

Tuesday - 9000 concentration

Report by Dave Clark

Just a short report today. We had eleven in attendance with as expected a lot of concentration on the BSO 9000's repaint.

There were seven of us working on BSO 9000. On the Cotswold side, Richard Hoy, Malcolm, and Robbie (just visible) continued applying more filler and sanding down. This included the parts of the cleaned-up rivet line where John Hamer had replaced some of the rivets and applied the water-proof chemical metal in the groove.


John Hamer is busy re-riveting one of the window frames, while at the far end Keith is busy sanding down the edges and frames of the Guards door and disabled access double doors - it is essential that paint is not allowed to build up to prevent doors from sticking.
 
Ainsley was duly filling and sanding another of the door.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
What work gets done is always dependent on who arrives. So we always have a wide range of work continuing. 

Tony Barnard was again busy on the Malvern side of SK 25451, generally pad sanding down the north end side panelling before applying Owatrol oil (the orange tin in his hand) which besides being an excellent paint conditioner, also cures rust and provides a good sealant for cleaned up metal.
 
He watches Cheryl applying the first top coat of Olive Drab to more planks for the Wartime Van.

 
In the Workshop, Richard Stone is preparing more wood for the van,











while Phil Hooton applies red oxide to the van's north end buffers and beam.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In the Upholstery shop, Vivian was detaching the various segments of the cover from one the first class DMU seats.

 









Dave was busy with that curved needle, attaching an old cover to a seat back to provide further padding.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rather later than expected another pair of bogies were dispatched for wheel turning which will just about complete that exercise having caught up the wheel flats situation.  Having managed to obtain 'new' bogies and carriages they always need some tender care before putting into operation. Most have been left in sidings, unmoved, for several years before they are finally deemed surplus to requirements and made available.














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